Health and wellness Tips

A simple pen and paper can dramatically boost your weight loss. Studies show the act of writing down what you eat and drink tends to make you more aware of what, when, and how much you're consuming -- leading you to ultimately take in fewer calories. One study found that people who kept a food diary six days a week lost about twice as much as those who only kept a diary one day a week or less. – Dietitian Sheela Seharawat.

Lose weight with this simple trick.

The best "diet" is one where you get to eat more food, not less. If you eat more fruits and vegetables, you shouldn't feel as hungry because these nutrient-rich foods are also high in fiber and water, which can give you a feeling of fullness. Snacking can be a good thing as long as you choose smart snacks. – Dietitian Sheela Seharawat.

Always eat more fruits and vegetables.

Fiber aids digestion, prevents constipation, and lowers cholesterol -- and can help with weight loss. Most Americans get only half the fiber they need. To reap fiber's benefits, most women should get about 25 grams daily, while men need about 38 grams -- or 14 grams per 1,000 calories. Good fiber sources include oatmeal, beans, whole grain foods, and a variety of fruits and vegetables. – Dietitian Sheela Seharawat.


 

Fibers and weight loss.

Fiber aids digestion, prevents constipation, and lowers cholesterol -- and can help with weight loss. Most Americans get only half the fiber they need. To reap fiber's benefits, most women should get about 25 grams daily, while men need about 38 grams -- or 14 grams per 1,000 calories. Good fiber sources include oatmeal, beans, whole grain foods, and a variety of fruits and vegetables. – Dietitian Sheela Seharawat.

Importance of fibers in your daily diet.

Keep a food journal to pay attention to what you eat and how you feel when you eat it. You may be surprised by your eating habits. You can write down your meals or download an app for your smart phone or tablet. You don't have to track your meals every day. Just track it one day a week or for a few days to get an idea of what and how you eat. – Dietitian Sheela Seharawat.

Tips to keep track of what you eat.

Don't give up on healthy eating just because you're out of time. Have a healthy-eating plan in place for days when you work late or have errands to run. Keep nutritious snacks with you, like trail mix, whole grain cereal, or fruit. Keep healthy foods in your freezer. Learn which restaurants and supermarket delis have salad, soup, or grilled chicken so if you have to eat "to go," you can make healthy choices. – Dietitian Sheela Seharawat.

This is how you can eat right food.

If you're too rushed in the morning to make breakfast, take it with you to eat at school or work. Portable breakfast items can include granola or breakfast bars, containers of yogurt, instant oatmeal packets, or pieces of fresh fruit. Muffins, bagels, and other baked goods are often larger than a single serving -- consider portion sizes carefully. Even if you don't like typical breakfast foods, it's important to eat something in the morning to fuel your body. – Dietitian Sheela Seharawat.

Breakfast: Most important meal of the day.

Give up one sugary soda a day. Cutting just one can of regular cola means losing more than 30 grams of sugar -- or about 8 teaspoons -- from your diet. Replace sodas and other sugary drinks with water or unsweetened tea. Other ways to cut sugar: Fresh fruit or fruit canned in water or juice has less sugar than fruit canned in syrup. And choose unsweetened cereals. – Dietitian Sheela Seharawat.

Start giving up sugary food right away.

Just like eating at home, planning can help you make smarter choices in restaurants. Find one that serves a children's menu or smaller portion sizes. Don't let yourself get so hungry that you overeat. Have a healthy snack beforehand. Or start with a clear (not creamy) soup or salad. Cut your meal in half and take one half to home. Or split an entrée with a friend. Ask the waiter not to bring any bread or tortilla chips to your table. – Dietitian Sheela Seharawat.

This is how you can eat smart at restaurants.

Get unhealthy snacks out of your office -- or at least out of plain sight. You'll eat less if you don't have food within easy reach. If you tend to graze mindlessly at work, don't keep food at your desk. Keep it at least 6 feet away from where you sit. The distance makes you think each time you grab a bite. Take time for a real lunch break, away from your desk. – Dietitian Sheela Seharawat.

Eat less snacks less at work for good health.

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Diet Clinic ® is a program of regular follow-up visits/ telephonic/ contact during the diet plans phase of the program. Results may vary from patient to patient. Rapid weight loss may be associated with certain medical conditions and should only be considered by those who are medically appropriate.